Understanding Crohn’s Testing

Crohn's patient and her doctor

Tests and procedures aren’t always
the most pleasant. But they’re
important.

When it comes to diagnosing and understanding how Crohn’s affects you, it’s essential that you and your doctor remain partners throughout the experience. Keep in mind that the main goal is to control your symptoms—getting you into remission.

Crohn's patient and her doctor

Be Ready for Every Doctor Visit, Test, and Procedure

Whether you’re seeing your gastroenterologist for a check-up or scheduled for a colonoscopy, it’s always important to be prepared for your visit. When it comes to Crohn’s tests and procedures, there are 2 main reasons for them:

Diagnosis

To determine whether or not you have Crohn's disease

Evaluation

To reevaluate your Crohn’s and how it’s affecting you—something you and your gastroenterologist will likely want to do on an ongoing, regular basis

How much of your time is your Crohn's impacting? Find out and make a personal action plan.

What Are Common Tests for Crohn’s Disease?

Blood Tests

Even though blood tests alone can’t diagnose Crohn’s, they’re an important tool in diagnosis and monitoring of the disease. These are only some of the blood tests used for Crohn’s. There are others your doctor may recommend.

Routine Blood Tests

Used to detect infection, anemia (caused by bleeding), indicators of inflammation, and deficiencies of vitamins or minerals.

Stool Tests

Imaging Tests

These are tests that take pictures of different parts of your body to provide a clearer view of your condition. They show your doctor areas of disease activity and possible complications. These are only some of the imaging tests used for Crohn’s. There are others your doctor may recommend.

Conventional X-rays

A standard X-ray of your abdominal area can show narrowing, widening, or development of a perforation of the intestines or an intestinal blockage—possibly from inflammation or scarring. It may also be done to rule out certain Crohn’s complications.

Contrast X-rays
Computerized Tomography (CT) Scans
Leukocyte Scintigraphy (White Blood Cell Scan)
Endoscopy (Includes Colonoscopy)
Endoscopic Ultrasound
Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

Biomarker Tests

Found in blood (and other body fluids or tissues) are biological molecules called biomarkers. These molecules are a sign of a normal or abnormal process—or of a condition or disease. At the same time, biomarkers can assist in seeing how well a person's body is responding to treatment.

Ways Biomarkers Can Help With Crohn’s Monitoring

  • Biomarkers are a less invasive test for detecting inflammation in your gastrointestinal tract.
  • Biomarkers allow serial monitoring of Crohn’s disease activity and assist in determining treatment success.

QUESTION FOR YOU

How long have you been diagnosed?

“I’m not diagnosed”

It’s still important to be open about symptoms you might be experiencing.

Partner with your doctor>

"Under a year"

Always stay positive and be proactive. Make sure you know the facts about your condition.

GET THE FACT SHEET>

"1 to 3 years"

Make the most out of every appointment with your specialist.

GET THE Doctor Discussion Guide>

"3 to 5 years"

Do you know how inflammation affects you inside the body—and impacts your symptoms?

See Inside Inflammation>

"Over 5 years"

Keep treatment conversations open with your specialist and have more productive visits.

Get The Doctor Discussion Guide>

QUESTION FOR YOU

How often do you experience symptoms?

“Daily”

Schedule an appointment with your specialist and make the visit even more productive.

Get the Doctor Discussion Guide>

“Weekly”

Have an open conversation with your specialist. Make the most of your next visit.

Get the Doctor Discussion Guide>

“Monthly”

Make sure that you’re telling your doctor everything they need to know to help you.

GET THE Doctor Discussion Guide>

“Rarely”

Did you know that inflammation can affect you—even if you don’t have symptoms?

SEE INSIDE INFLAMMATION>

Know the basics of Crohn’s or UC

See an overview of facts on Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis (UC)—all on one downloadable page.

Understand your inflammation

Explore and learn how inflammation affects you with Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis (UC)—from inside the body.

3 Reasons to Be Open and Honest With Your Doctor

1

Having a good relationship with the right specialist for your Crohn’s can help you both have a clear idea of what is going on with your body and how to manage it.

2

Your doctor relies on what you tell him or her to get the full picture of how your disease is affecting your life. Use resources like the Doctor Discussion Guide to help make appointments go a little more seamlessly.

3

When you and your doctor have a good sense of what’s going on with your Crohn’s, you’ll be able to confidently move toward a treatment plan that’s right for you.

Learn about treatment options for Crohn's disease.

Looking for a gastroenterologist?

Find a gastroenterologist—a doctor who specializes in Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis (UC)—near you.

Make the most of your appointments

Our doctor discussion guide can help you talk effectively with your doctor during your visits.

Stopwatch

Is it time make a personalized action plan?

See how much time your disease is impacting you. Answer 5 quick questions and get 3 customized, timely steps to help you and your doctor take action with your disease.

Get a Restroom Request Card* and helpful info

Have a discreet way to ask for access to restricted restrooms if you have symptoms. And get updates, resources, and more sent to your inbox.

Understand your inflammation

Explore and learn how inflammation affects you with Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis (UC)—from inside the body.

Make the most of your appointments

Our doctor discussion guide can help you talk effectively with your doctor during your visits.

Looking for a gastroenterologist?

Find a gastroenterologist—a doctor who specializes in Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis (UC)—near you.

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