YOU CAN MAKE THE MOST OF EVERY DOCTOR VISIT

Smiling doctor

Partner with your doctor and be your own best advocate.

A good relationship with your healthcare team can help you take charge of your appointments and treatment plan. Tracking your symptoms and following up with your doctor are great steps in managing your visits.

Smiling doctor

Taking Control of Your Healthcare

Patients should feel comfortable with their healthcare team to make their health a priority. If you’re not getting the support you need, or feel your current team is not a good fit, consider switching to another doctor. It is your right to seek another opinion or switch doctors—and many understand that some patients need to find the best care for them. Once you find the right gastroenterologist for you, work with them as a team towards remission.

Find out about a treatment option for moderate to severe ulcerative colitis and moderate to severe Crohn’s disease.

Types of Appointments

Every doctor’s visit may not be the same, so you may prepare differently for each appointment. Different types of visits may include:

  • Initial Consultation
  • Second (or more) Opinion
  • Routine Check-up
  • Inflammation Assessment (such as a colonoscopy)
  • Follow-up
    • To review test
    • Discuss treatment, etc.
  • Symptom Visit
    • Review symptoms
    • Discuss medication changes

If you feel you need to alter your appointment schedule based on your symptoms, treatment questions, or other concerns, don't hesitate to be your own best advocate and contact your GI practice to request a schedule that works best for you. And know that there are helpful resources our there for you to help you keep the momentum going—like making a personal action plan.

Person sitting at a desk writing with pencil in hand

QUESTION FOR YOU

How long have you been diagnosed?

"I'm not diagnosed"

It’s still important to be open about symptoms you might be experiencing.

Partner with your doctor>

 

"Under a year"

Always stay positive and be proactive. Make sure you know the facts about your condition.

GET THE FACT SHEET>

"1 to 3 years"

Make the most out of every appointment with your specialist.

GET THE Doctor Discussion Guide>

"3 to 5 years"

Do you know how inflammation affects you inside the body—and impacts your symptoms?

See Inside Inflammation>

 

"Over 5 years"

Keep treatment conversations open with your specialist and have more productive visits.

Get The Doctor Discussion Guide>

 

Man holding stomach in pain

QUESTION FOR YOU

How often do you experience symptoms?

“Daily”

Schedule an appointment with your specialist and make the visit even more productive.

Get the Doctor Discussion Guide>

“Weekly”

Have an open conversation with your specialist. Make the most of your next visit.

Get the Doctor Discussion Guide>

“Monthly”

Make sure that you’re telling your doctor everything they need to know to help you.

Get the Doctor Discussion Guide>

“Rarely”

Did you know that inflammation can affect you—even if you don’t have symptoms?

SEE INSIDE INFLAMMATION>

Person typing on laptop keyboard

Know the basics of Crohn’s or UC

See an overview of facts on Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis (UC)—all on one downloadable page.

son sitting at a desk viewing inflammation inside the body on a laptop

Understand your inflammation

Explore and learn how inflammation affects you with Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis (UC)—from inside the body.

What to Do Before, During, and Immediately After Your Doctor Visits

Before Each Appointment
  • If you’re a new patient, check to see if your insurance is accepted and be ready to provide your medical history.
  • Bring a log of your symptoms and how they affect you to each appointment—even ones that may seem unrelated to your condition. The Doctor Discussion Guide or making a personal action plan can help.
  • Keep a log of questions in between appointments to help you remember what you want to ask. Questions could include things related to your symptoms, treatment, insurance, etc.
  • Make sure the office staff knows the nature of your concerns when scheduling appointments. A first visit will need more time than a follow-up or a routine check-up.
  • Consider bringing a friend or relative to your appointments to help you take notes, help you discuss your concerns, and talk with your healthcare team.
During Each Appointment
Before You Leave the Office

Stay on Top of Your Health and History

It’s also important to keep track of your medical history. Since many doctors’ offices use electronic medical records (EMRs), you might want to ask your healthcare team if they are using an EMR system. If so, you could have access to it to help you keep track of your health information online.

Person looking at map on mobile phone

Looking for a gastroenterologist?

Find a gastroenterologist—a doctor who specializes in Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis (UC)—near you.

Woman going over her doctor discussion guide with her doctor

Make the most of your appointments

Our doctor discussion guide can help you talk effectively with your doctor during your visits.

Stopwatch

Is it time make a personalized action plan?

See how much time your disease is impacting you. Answer 5 quick questions and get 3 customized, timely steps to help you and your doctor take action with your disease.

Hand holding restroom request card

Get a Restroom Request Card* and helpful info

Have a discreet way to ask for access to restricted restrooms if you have symptoms. And get updates, resources, and more sent to your inbox.

Person sitting at a desk viewing inflammation inside the body on a laptop

Understand your inflammation

Explore and learn how inflammation affects you with Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis (UC)—from inside the body.

Woman going over her doctor discussion guide with her doctor

Make the most of your appointments

Our doctor discussion guide can help you talk effectively with your doctor during your visits.

Person looking at map on mobile phone

Looking for a gastroenterologist?

Find a gastroenterologist—a doctor who specializes in Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis (UC)—near you.

ISI Column 1


AbbVie